In the previous posts of this series we talked about our solution to handle multiple screen sizes for game menus, in particular we showed the main menu of the game Clash of the Olympians. In this post we are going to talk about what we did inside the game itself. As a side note, the solution we used here is simple and specific for this game, hope it could help as example but don’t expect a silver bullet.

Scaling to match the physics world

As we use Box2D in Clash of the Olympians, the first step was to use a proper scale between Box2D bodies and our assets. The basic approach was to consider that 1m (meter in MKS system) was 32px, so in our target resolution of 800x480 could show 25m x 15m. We picked that scale because it gives pretty numbers both in terms of the game area and in terms of our assets, for example, a character of 64px of height is 2m tall. In particular, Achilles has a height of approx 60px which is equivalent to 1.875m using our scale, that sounds pretty reasonable for that character.

clashoftheolympians-800x480
The image shows the relation between screen size in pixels (800x480 in this case) and the game world in meters.

Defining a virtual area to show

We previously said that we could show 25m x 15m, in fact, the height is not so important in Clash of the Olympians since the game mainly depends in the horizontal distance. So, if we had an imaginary with a resolution of 800x400 (really wide, an aspect ratio of 2) we would show in that case 12.5m of height, we could assume that if we show at least that height the game balance would be not affected at all (enemies are never spawned too high). However, in terms of horizontal distance we want to show always the same area across all devices to avoid changing the game balance (for example, if you could see less area you couldn’t react in the proper time to some waves), that is why we decided to show always 25m in terms of width.

clashoftheolympians-800x600

The image shows how we still show the same game world width of 25m on a 800x600 device.

Scaling the world back to match the screen size

Finally, in order to show this virtual area of 25m x H (with H >= 12.5m), we have to calculate the proper scale to set our game camera in each device. For example, in the case of having a Nexus 7 (1280x720 resolution device) the scale to show 25m of horizontal size is 51.2x since we know that 1280 / scale = 25, then 1280 / 25 = 51.2. In the case of a Samsung Galaxy Y (480x320 resolution device) the scale would be 19.2x since 480 / 25 = 19.2. Translating this inside the game would be something as easy as:

camera.scale = screen.width / 25

Final thoughts

This is not a general solution, it depends a lot in the game we were making and the things we could assume like the game height doesn’t matter.

Even though the solution is specific and not so cool as the previous posts, we hope it could be of help when making your own game.


In this post we want to share how our resources manager implementation helped us when we had to localize Clash of the Olympians.

Our resources manager

Some time ago we started a small java project named jresourcesmanager (yeah, the most creative name in the world) which provides a simple abstraction of what a resource is and how it is loaded. It consists in some basic concepts named Resource, DataLoader and ResourceManager.

Resource

Is the concept of an application resource/asset, and provides an API to know if the resource is loaded or not and to load and unload it. Here is the code:

public class Resource<T> {  
	T data = null;  

	DataLoader<T> dataLoader;  

	protected Resource(DataLoader<T> dataLoader) {  
		this(dataLoader, true);  
	}  

	protected Resource(DataLoader<T> dataLoader, boolean deferred) {  
		this.dataLoader = dataLoader;  
		if (!deferred)  
			reload();  
	}  

	/** 
		* Returns the data stored by the Resource. 
		*/  
	public T get() {  
		if (!isLoaded())  
			load();  
		return data;  
	}  
		
	public void set(T data) {  
		this.data = data;  
	}  

	public DataLoader<T> getDataLoader() {  
		return dataLoader;  
	}  
		
	public void setDataLoader(DataLoader<T> dataLoader) {  
		unload();  
		this.dataLoader = dataLoader;  
	}  

	/** 
		* Reloads the internal data by calling unload and load(). 
		*/  
	public void reload() {  
		unload();  
		load();  
	}  

	/** 
		* Loads the data if it wasn't loaded yet, it does nothing otherwise. 
		*/  
	public void load() {  
		if (!isLoaded())  
			data = dataLoader.load();  
	}  

	/** 
		* Unloads the data by calling the DataLoader.unload(t) method. 
		*/  
	public void unload() {  
		if (isLoaded()) {  
			dataLoader.unload(data);  
			data = null;  
		}  
	}  

	/** 
		* Returns true if the data is loaded, false otherwise. 
		*/  
	public boolean isLoaded() {  
		return data != null;  
	}  

	public Resource<T> clone() {  
		return new Resource<T>(dataLoader);  
	}  	
}  

DataLoader

Provides an API to define a way to load and unload a Resource, here is the code:

    public abstract class DataLoader<T> {  
      
        /** 
         * Implements how to load the data. 
         */  
        public abstract T load();  
      
        /** 
         * Implements how to unload the data, if it is nod automatic and you need to unload stuff by hand. 
         */  
        public void unload(T t) {  
      
        }  
      
        /** 
         * Provides a way to return custom information about the data loader. 
         *  
         * @return An object with the custom information. 
         */  
        public Object getMetaData() {  
            return null;  
        }  
      
    }  

ResourceManager

It is just a map with all the resources identified by a key, which can be a String for example, and an API to store and get resources to and from, respectively.

That is our resources management code, it is really simple and fulfilled our needs in assets loading/unloading for Vampire Runner and Clash of the Olympians.

The interesting part of this library is that it allows you to store whatever you want to consider as a resource/asset, and that feature is what we used in order to solve the localization issue.

Declaring resources

Another important pillar is how we declare resources in an easy way through the code, and that is by using some builders that simplified the resource declaration. As we were using LibGDX library, we created a resource builder for LibGDX assets and more. This resource builder allowed us to do stuff like this:

splitLoadingTextureAtlas("MainTextureAtlas", "data/images/screens/mainmenu/pack");
resource("MainBackgroundTop", sprite2().textureAtlas("MainTextureAtlas", "mainmenu-bg", 1).center(0.5f, 0.5f).trySpriteAtlas());

That declares a texture atlas with the name of MainTextureAtlas and then a resource which is a sprite with the name of MainBackgroundTop from a texture atlas resource identified by the previous name. Also, allow us to do stuff like declare that the sprite is centered in the middle (the anchor point) and more.

This code is not important, just an example of some of our builders.

Declaring localized resources

As we have the power to create complex resource builders and we needed a simple way to switch between assets given the language selected, we created a resource builder which allowed us to declare different resources, depending the current locale, using the same identifier. So, for example, we can do something like this:

resource("CreditsButton", new MultilanguageResourceBuilder<Sprite>() //
	.defaultLocale(new Locale("en")) //
	.resource(new Locale("en"), sprite2().textureAtlas(TextureAtlases.MeinMenu, "mainmenu-but-credits-en", 1).trySpriteAtlas()) //
	.resource(new Locale("es"), sprite2().textureAtlas(TextureAtlases.MeinMenu, "mainmenu-but-credits-es", 1).trySpriteAtlas()) //
			);

That declares a resource named CreditsButton which returns a sprite with index 1 and name “mainmenu-but-credits-en” from a texture atlas in case the locale is English and a sprite with index 1 and name “mainmenu-but-credits-es” in case the locale is Spanish. It also declares that the default locale (in case a resource for the current locale wasn’t found) is English.

This resource builder was very handy because it allowed us to declare any type of resource for different locales, and from the application side it was transparent, we just ask for the resource CreditsButton.

In case you are interested, the code of the MultilanguageResoruceBuilder is:

public class MultilanguageResourceBuilder<T> implements ResourceBuilder<T> {

	private Map<Locale, ResourceBuilder<T>> resourceBuilders = new HashMap<Locale, ResourceBuilder<T>>();
	private Locale defaultLocale;

	@Override
	public boolean isVolatile() {
		if (defaultLocale == null)
			throw new IllegalStateException("Multilanguage resource builder needs a default locale");
		ResourceBuilder<T> resourceBuilder = resourceBuilders.get(defaultLocale);
		if (resourceBuilder == null)
			throw new IllegalStateException("Multilanguage resource builder needs a default resource builder");
		return resourceBuilder.isVolatile();
	}

	public MultilanguageResourceBuilder<T> defaultLocale(Locale locale) {
		this.defaultLocale = locale;
		return this;
	}

	public MultilanguageResourceBuilder<T> resource(Locale locale, ResourceBuilder<T> resourceBuilder) {
		resourceBuilders.put(locale, resourceBuilder);
		return this;
	}

	@Override
	public T build() {
		Locale locale = Locale.getDefault();

		if (defaultLocale == null)
			throw new IllegalStateException("Multilanguage resource builder needs a default locale");

		if (!resourceBuilders.containsKey(locale))
			locale = defaultLocale;

		ResourceBuilder<T> resourceBuilder = resourceBuilders.get(locale);

		if (resourceBuilder == null)
			throw new IllegalStateException("Multilanguage resource builder needs a default resource builder");

		return resourceBuilder.build();
	}
}

Conclusion

That was the way we used to support multiple languages in a transparent way for the application, we just need to change the current locale and reload the assets.

Hope this blog post idea helps you in case you are about to support multiple languages in your game, and see you next time.


Continuing with the previous blog post, in this post we are going to talk about the code behind the theory. It consists in three concepts, the VirtualViewport, the OrthographicCameraWithVirtualViewport and the MultipleVirtualViewportBuilder.

VirtualViewport

It defines a virtual area where the game stuff is contained and provides a way to get the real width and height to use with a camera in order to always show the virtual area. Here is the code of this class:

public class VirtualViewport {

	float virtualWidth;
	float virtualHeight;

	public float getVirtualWidth() {
		return virtualWidth;
	}

	public float getVirtualHeight() {
		return virtualHeight;
	}

	public VirtualViewport(float virtualWidth, float virtualHeight) {
		this(virtualWidth, virtualHeight, false);
	}

	public VirtualViewport(float virtualWidth, float virtualHeight, boolean shrink) {
		this.virtualWidth = virtualWidth;
		this.virtualHeight = virtualHeight;
	}

	public float getWidth() {
		return getWidth(Gdx.graphics.getWidth(), Gdx.graphics.getHeight());
	}

	public float getHeight() {
		return getHeight(Gdx.graphics.getWidth(), Gdx.graphics.getHeight());
	}

	/**
	 * Returns the view port width to let all the virtual view port to be shown on the screen.
	 * 
	 * @param screenWidth
	 *            The screen width.
	 * @param screenHeight
	 *            The screen Height.
	 */
	public float getWidth(float screenWidth, float screenHeight) {
		float virtualAspect = virtualWidth / virtualHeight;
		float aspect = screenWidth / screenHeight;
		if (aspect > virtualAspect || (Math.abs(aspect - virtualAspect) < 0.01f)) {
			return virtualHeight * aspect;
		} else {
			return virtualWidth;
		}
	}

	/**
	 * Returns the view port height to let all the virtual view port to be shown on the screen.
	 * 
	 * @param screenWidth
	 *            The screen width.
	 * @param screenHeight
	 *            The screen Height.
	 */
	public float getHeight(float screenWidth, float screenHeight) {
		float virtualAspect = virtualWidth / virtualHeight;
		float aspect = screenWidth / screenHeight;
		if (aspect > virtualAspect || (Math.abs(aspect - virtualAspect) < 0.01f)) {
			return virtualHeight;
		} else {
			return virtualWidth / aspect;
		}
	}

}

So, if we have a virtual area of 640x480 and want to show it on a screen of 800x480 we can do the next steps in order to get the proper values that we have to use as the camera viewport for that screen:

VirtualViewport virtualViewport = new VirtualViewport(640, 480);
float realViewportWidth = virtualViewport.getWidth(800, 480);
float realViewportHeight = virtualViewport.getHeight(800, 480);
// now set the camera viewport values
camera.setViewportFor(realViewportWidth, realViewportHeight);

OrthographicCameraWithVirtualViewport

In order to simplify the work when using LibGDX library, we created a subclass of LibGDX’s OrthographicCamera with specific behavior to update the camera viewport using the VirtualViewport values. Here is its code:

public class OrthographicCameraWithVirtualViewport extends OrthographicCamera {

	Vector3 tmp = new Vector3();
	Vector2 origin = new Vector2();
	VirtualViewport virtualViewport;
	
	public void setVirtualViewport(VirtualViewport virtualViewport) {
		this.virtualViewport = virtualViewport;
	}

	public OrthographicCameraWithVirtualViewport(VirtualViewport virtualViewport) {
		this(virtualViewport, 0f, 0f);
	}

	public OrthographicCameraWithVirtualViewport(VirtualViewport virtualViewport, float cx, float cy) {
		this.virtualViewport = virtualViewport;
		this.origin.set(cx, cy);
	}

	public void setPosition(float x, float y) {
		position.set(x - viewportWidth * origin.x, y - viewportHeight * origin.y, 0f);
	}

	@Override
	public void update() {
		float left = zoom * -viewportWidth / 2 + virtualViewport.getVirtualWidth() * origin.x;
		float right = zoom * viewportWidth / 2 + virtualViewport.getVirtualWidth() * origin.x;
		float top = zoom * viewportHeight / 2 + virtualViewport.getVirtualHeight() * origin.y;
		float bottom = zoom * -viewportHeight / 2 + virtualViewport.getVirtualHeight() * origin.y;

		projection.setToOrtho(left, right, bottom, top, Math.abs(near), Math.abs(far));
		view.setToLookAt(position, tmp.set(position).add(direction), up);
		combined.set(projection);
		Matrix4.mul(combined.val, view.val);
		invProjectionView.set(combined);
		Matrix4.inv(invProjectionView.val);
		frustum.update(invProjectionView);
	}

	/**
	 * This must be called in ApplicationListener.resize() in order to correctly update the camera viewport. 
	 */
	public void updateViewport() {
		setToOrtho(false, virtualViewport.getWidth(), virtualViewport.getHeight());
	}
}

MultipleVirtualViewportBuilder

This class allows us to build a better VirtualViewport given the minimum and maximum areas we want to support performing the logic we explained in the previous post. For example, if we have a minimum area of 800x480 and a maximum area of 854x600, then, given a device of 480x320 (3:2) it will return a VirtualViewport of 854x570 which is a good match of a resolution which contains the minimum area and is smaller than the maximum area and has the same aspect ratio of 480x320.

public class MultipleVirtualViewportBuilder {

	private final float minWidth;
	private final float minHeight;
	private final float maxWidth;
	private final float maxHeight;

	public MultipleVirtualViewportBuilder(float minWidth, float minHeight, float maxWidth, float maxHeight) {
		this.minWidth = minWidth;
		this.minHeight = minHeight;
		this.maxWidth = maxWidth;
		this.maxHeight = maxHeight;
	}

	public VirtualViewport getVirtualViewport(float width, float height) {
		if (width >= minWidth && width <= maxWidth && height >= minHeight && height <= maxHeight)
			return new VirtualViewport(width, height, true);

		float aspect = width / height;

		float scaleForMinSize = minWidth / width;
		float scaleForMaxSize = maxWidth / width;

		float virtualViewportWidth = width * scaleForMaxSize;
		float virtualViewportHeight = virtualViewportWidth / aspect;

		if (insideBounds(virtualViewportWidth, virtualViewportHeight))
			return new VirtualViewport(virtualViewportWidth, virtualViewportHeight, false);

		virtualViewportWidth = width * scaleForMinSize;
		virtualViewportHeight = virtualViewportWidth / aspect;

		if (insideBounds(virtualViewportWidth, virtualViewportHeight))
			return new VirtualViewport(virtualViewportWidth, virtualViewportHeight, false);
		
		return new VirtualViewport(minWidth, minHeight, true);
	}
	
	private boolean insideBounds(float width, float height) {
		if (width < minWidth || width > maxWidth)
			return false;
		if (height < minHeight || height > maxHeight)
			return false;
		return true;
	}

}

In case the aspect ratio is not supported, it will return the minimum area.

Floating elements

As we explained in the previous post, there are some cases where we need stuff that should be always at fixed positions in the screen, for example, the audio and music buttons in Clash of the Olympians. In order to do that we need to make the position of those buttons depend on the VirtualViewport. In the next section where we explain how to use all together we show an example of how to do a floating element.

Using the code together

Finally, here is an example showing how to use these concepts in a LibGDX application:

public class VirtualViewportExampleMain extends com.badlogic.gdx.Game {

	private OrthographicCameraWithVirtualViewport camera;
	
	// extra stuff for the example
	private SpriteBatch spriteBatch;
	private Sprite minimumAreaSprite;
	private Sprite maximumAreaSprite;
	private Sprite floatingButtonSprite;
	private BitmapFont font;

	private MultipleVirtualViewportBuilder multipleVirtualViewportBuilder;

	@Override
	public void create() {
		multipleVirtualViewportBuilder = new MultipleVirtualViewportBuilder(800, 480, 854, 600);
		VirtualViewport virtualViewport = multipleVirtualViewportBuilder.getVirtualViewport(Gdx.graphics.getWidth(), Gdx.graphics.getHeight());
		
		camera = new OrthographicCameraWithVirtualViewport(virtualViewport);
		// centers the camera at 0, 0 (the center of the virtual viewport)
		camera.position.set(0f, 0f, 0f);
		
		// extra code
		spriteBatch = new SpriteBatch();
		
		Pixmap pixmap = new Pixmap(64, 64, Format.RGBA8888);
		pixmap.setColor(Color.WHITE);
		pixmap.fillRectangle(0, 0, 64, 64);
		
		minimumAreaSprite = new Sprite(new Texture(pixmap));
		minimumAreaSprite.setPosition(-400, -240);
		minimumAreaSprite.setSize(800, 480);
		minimumAreaSprite.setColor(0f, 1f, 0f, 1f);
		
		maximumAreaSprite = new Sprite(new Texture(pixmap));
		maximumAreaSprite.setPosition(-427, -300);
		maximumAreaSprite.setSize(854, 600);
		maximumAreaSprite.setColor(1f, 1f, 0f, 1f);
		
		floatingButtonSprite = new Sprite(new Texture(pixmap));
		floatingButtonSprite.setPosition(virtualViewport.getVirtualWidth() * 0.5f - 80, virtualViewport.getVirtualHeight() * 0.5f - 80);
		floatingButtonSprite.setSize(64, 64);
		floatingButtonSprite.setColor(1f, 1f, 1f, 1f);
		
		font = new BitmapFont();
		font.setColor(Color.BLACK);
	}
	
	@Override
	public void resize(int width, int height) {
		super.resize(width, height);
		
		VirtualViewport virtualViewport = multipleVirtualViewportBuilder.getVirtualViewport(Gdx.graphics.getWidth(), Gdx.graphics.getHeight());
		camera.setVirtualViewport(virtualViewport);
		
		camera.updateViewport();
		// centers the camera at 0, 0 (the center of the virtual viewport)
		camera.position.set(0f, 0f, 0f);
		
		// relocate floating stuff
		floatingButtonSprite.setPosition(virtualViewport.getVirtualWidth() * 0.5f - 80, virtualViewport.getVirtualHeight() * 0.5f - 80);
	}
	
	@Override
	public void render() {
		super.render();
		Gdx.gl.glClearColor(1f, 0f, 0f, 1f);
		Gdx.gl.glClear(GL10.GL_COLOR_BUFFER_BIT);
		camera.update();
		
		// render stuff...
		spriteBatch.setProjectionMatrix(camera.combined);
		spriteBatch.begin();
		maximumAreaSprite.draw(spriteBatch);
		minimumAreaSprite.draw(spriteBatch);
		floatingButtonSprite.draw(spriteBatch);
		font.draw(spriteBatch, String.format("%1$sx%2$s", Gdx.graphics.getWidth(), Gdx.graphics.getHeight()), -20, 0);
		spriteBatch.end();
	}

	public static void main(String[] args) {
		LwjglApplicationConfiguration config = new LwjglApplicationConfiguration();

		config.title = VirtualViewportExampleMain.class.getName();
		config.width = 800;
		config.height = 480;
		config.fullscreen = false;
		config.useGL20 = true;
		config.useCPUSynch = true;
		config.forceExit = true;
		config.vSyncEnabled = true;

		new LwjglApplication(new VirtualViewportExampleMain(), config);
	}

}

In the example there are three colors, green represents the minimum supported area, yellow the maximum supported area and red represents the area outside. If we see red it means that aspect ratio is not supported. There is a floating element colored white, which is always relocated in the top right corner of the screen, unless we are on an unsupported aspect ratio, in that case it is just located in the top right corner of the green area.

The next video shows the example in action:

UPDATE: you can download the source code to run on Eclipse from here.

Conclusion

In these two blog posts we explained in a simplified way how we managed to support different aspect ratios and resolutions for Clash of the Olympians, a technique that could be used as an acceptable way of handling different screen sizes for a wide range of games, and it is not hard to use.

As always, we hope you liked it and that it could be useful for you when developing your games. Opinions and suggestions are always welcome if you want to comment 🙂 and also share it if you liked it and think other people could benefit from this code.

Thanks for reading.


Developing games for multiple devices is not an easy task. Given the variety of devices, one of the most common problem is having to handle multiple screen sizes, which means different resolutions and aspect ratios.

In this blog post we want to share what we did to minimize this problem when making Ironhide’s Clash of the Olympians for Android.

In the next sections we are going to show some common ways of handling the multiple screens problem and then our way.

Stretching the content

One common approach when developing a game is making the game for a fixed resolution, for example, making the game for 800x480.

Based on that, you can have the next layout in one of your game’s screens:


Main screen of Clash of the Olympians in a 800x480 device.

Then, to support other screen sizes the idea is to stretch the content to the other device screen:


Main screen on a 800x600 device, stretched from 800x480.

The main problem is that the aspect ratio is affected and that is visually unacceptable.

Stretching + keeping aspect ratio

To solve part of the previous problem, one common technique is stretching but keeping the correct aspect ratio by adding dead space to the borders of the screen so the real game area aspect ratio is the same on different devices. For example:


Main screen in a 800x600 device with borders.


Main screen in a 854x480 device with borders.

This is an easy way to attack this multiple screen size problem, you can even create some nice borders instead of the black borders shown in the previous image to improve how it looks.

However, in some cases this is not acceptable either since it doesn’t look so good or it feels like the game wasn’t made for that device.

Our solution: Using a Virtual Viewport

Our approach consists in adapting what is shown in the game screen area to the device screen size.

First, we define a range of aspect ratios we want to support, for example, in the case of clash we defined 4:3 (800x600) and 16:9 (854x480) as our border case aspect ratios, so all aspect ratios in the middle of those two should be supported.

Given those two aspect ratios, we defined our maximum area as 854x600 and our minimum area as 800x480 (the union and intersection between 800x600 and 854x480, respecively). The idea is to cover the maximum area with stuff, but the important stuff (buttons, information, etc) should be always included in the minimum area.


The red rectangle shows the minimum area while the blue rectangle shows the maximum area.

Then, given a device resolution we calculate an area that matches the device aspect ratio and is included in the virtual area. For example, given a device with a resolution of 816x544 (4:3), this is what is shown:


The green rectangle shows the matching area for 816x544.


This is how the main screen is shown in a 816x544 device.

In case we are on a bigger or lower resolution than the maximum or minimum area we defined, respectively, for example a screen of 480x320 (3:2), what we do is calculate the aspect ratio and find a corresponding match for that aspect ratio in the area we defined. In the case of the example, one match could be 800x534 since it is 3:2 aspect ratio and it is inside our virtual area. Then we scale down to fit the screen.


The green rectangle shows the calculated area for a resolution of 800x534 (matching the aspect of the 480x320 device).


This is what is shown of the main screen in a 480x320 device (click to enlarge the image).

Floating elements

For some elements of the game, such as buttons, maintaining their fixed world position for different screen sizes doesn’t look good, so what we do is making them floating elements. That means they are always at the same screen position, the next images shows an example with the main screen buttons:


Main screen's buttons distribution for a 854x480 device.


Main screen's buttons distribution for a 800x600 device. As you can see, buttons are relocated to match the screen size.

Finally, we want to show a video of this multiple screen sizes auto adjustment in real time:

Adjusting the game to the screen size in real time.

Some limitations

As we are scaling up/down in some cases to match the corresponding screen, some devices could perceive some blur since we are using linear filtering and the final position of the elements after the camera transformations could be not integer positions. This problem is minimized with better density devices and assets.

Layouts could change between different devices, for example, the layout for a phone could be different to the layout of a tablet device.

Text is a special case, when rendering text just downscaling it is not a correct solution since it could be not readable. You may have to re-layout text for lower resolution devices to show it bigger and readable.

Conclusion

If you design your game screens follow this approach, it is not so hard to support multiple screen sizes in an acceptable way. However there is still a lot of detail to take care of, like the problems we talked in the previous section.

In the next part of this blog post we will show some code based on LibGDX for those interested in how we implemented all this.

Thanks for reading and hope you liked it.


For the last eight months approx we were working with Ironhide Game Studio on a port to Android of their game Clash of the Olympians originally made for Flash. We are happy to announce that it was released on Google Play on last December 6th.

It is not a direct port since it has new features like bonuses for making combos during the game, new enemy behaviors, a hero room to see your score when you finish the game and multiple save slots. Also, the game mechanics changed a bit since they were adapted to touch devices and the game was rebalanced to match the new controls.

If you didn’t already, go and get it on Google Play:

https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.ironhide.games.clashoftheolympians

QR code:

Hope you enjoy it.